NEWS

GREENMAX will be the focus of Styrofoam recycling industry in South Africa

 

It is obvious that Styrofoam has received some negative publicity over recent years. Due to the increasing environmental problems, many countries and regions have started to ban the use of Styrofoam products. Of course, there are also some countries that are making efforts to recycle it.

 

South Africa has been trying to recycle Styrofoam waste for many years. In 2016, more than 1377 tons of Styrofoam waste were recycled for use in picture frames, and this figures continued to increase in 2017. In fact, Styrofoam is a valuable resource that can easily be recycled in South Africa.

 

 

Styrofoam contains more than 95% air, the lightweight made it a positive attribute that can significantly reduce carbon emissions during transport. However, it can also increase the transportation costs during recycling.

 

Last year, more than 5000 tons of Styrofoam waste were diverted from landfills and recycled into other products such as food containers, retail hangers, furniture packaging and photo frames.

 

Due to the development of these terminal markets, the demand of recyclers now exceeds the supply of materials. Therefore, we urge South Africans to remember to put their Styrofoam in clean recycling bags to prevent this valuable resource from ending up in landfills.

 

 

South Africa is striving to improve the recycling awareness of residents and introduce advanced equipment and technology.

 

As the Styrofoam recycling specialist, GREENMAX has received many inquiries from Africa recently. GREENMAX foam densiifer is well known in South Africa. Some recyclers have applied such machine to help reduce the foam volume and save transportation costs. The melting technology can turn loose foam into dense ingots at a ratio of 90:1, thus greatly promoted the recycling ratio of Styrofoam waste.

 

 

The effective recycling of Styrofoam waste can’t be without professional machines. GREENMAX will be the focus of Styrofoam recycling industry in South Africa.